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Mobility Matters: Learn about evidenced-based falls prevention and maintenance of mobility.


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Balance and other simple physical function measurements can predict cognitive decline

March 22, 2015

Published in the Research Insider, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute Although it may seem counter-intuitive, looking ‘below the neck’ for signs of cognitive decline before obvious symptoms appear is potentially a highly effective and accessible alternative to high-level cognitive neuroimaging or neurpsychological assessments. A new study by Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute scientist Dr. Teresa Liu-Ambrose reveals that simple measures of physical function, such as a person’s ability to balance, to walk, or their strength level, are strongly related to subtle changes in cognitive status and may predict cognitive function in the future. “We’re recognizing that dementia is a disease that probably develops over 20 to 30 years – it’s not necessarily … Read more

Category: Healthy Cognitive Aging, News

Examining the effect of the relationship between falls and mild cognitive impairment on mobility and executive functions in community-dwelling older adults.

March 20, 2015

J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015 Mar;63(3):590-3. doi: 10.1111/jgs.13290. Background Cognitive impairment and falls are geriatric “giants” that significantly increase morbidity and mortality in older adults. Even mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a significant risk factor for falls. Clinical gait abnormalities including slow gait and falls are early biomarkers of cognitive impairment, suggesting that impaired cognitive function and mobility share common underlying pathophysiology. Despite the vast interest in the interplay between impaired cognitive function and mobility, few studies to date have investigated whether their co-manifestation results in a broader and greater degree of deficits, potentially due to greater burden of pathology, than singular domain (i.e., cognitive or mobility) impairment. Understanding the specific and … Read more

Category: Falls Prevention, Healthy Cognitive Aging, Publication

Reduce falls by improving cognitive function

August 6, 2013

Originally published at UBC CPD, by Dr. Teresa Liu-Ambrose What I did before Falls are a common geriatric syndrome and are the third leading cause of chronic disability worldwide. Falls are not random events and occur, at least in part, due to impaired physiological function, such as impaired balance, and cognitive impairment. Primary care physicians can use the Physiological Profile Assessment screening tool – it has normative data (65 and up) and provides information for patients as well.1 Results from both systematic reviews and meta-analyses highlight that exercise can play an important role in falls prevention.2 The Otago Exercise Program (OEP) – a physical therapist-delivered, or nurse-delivered, progressive home-based strength and … Read more

Category: Falls Prevention, Healthy Cognitive Aging, Publication

A comparison of the ICECAP-O with EQ-5D in a falls prevention clinical setting: are they complements or substitutes?

June 22, 2013

Qual Life Res. 2013 Jun;22(5):969-77. doi: 10.1007/s11136-012-0225-4. Epub 2012 Jun 22. Among older adults living in the community, high quality research indicates the best way to reduce you risk of falling is to modify multiple risk factors based on your own personal risk factor profile for falling. Purpose Our research explored whether two preference-based outcome measures (EuroQol EQ-5D and ICECAP-O) are complements or substitutes in the context of the Vancouver Falls Prevention Clinic for seniors. Methods The EQ-5D and ICECAP-O were administered once at 12 months post first clinic attendance. We report descriptive statistics for all baseline characteristics collected at first clinic visit and primary outcomes of interest. We ascertain … Read more

Category: Adding Quality to Later Life Years, Publication